Podcast: I sit down with George Whitney of Complete EM and discuss: Active Shooters and After Actions

George Whitney of Complete EM each week speaks with people making a difference in emergency management. They talk about what works, what doesn't, how to work efficiently, and how to get it done with maximum effect. In this podcast ACTIVE SHOOTERS AND AFTER ACTIONS I speak with George about police response to active shooter incidents.

Sir Robert Peals, Nine Key Principles of Policing: Fair and Impartial Policing Defined Back In 1829!

Defining the path to community policing is based on Sir Robert Peals, nine key principles of policing he offered up back in 1829. When reading these I cannot help but think all the time we in policing spend trying to re-invent the wheel of sound ethical, fair and impartial policing when all we really need to do is adapt what already exists to the current climate.

  • Principle 1 – “The basic mission for which the police exist is to prevent crime and disorder.”

Herman Goldstein, Fundamental Objectives of Policing: Are They Relevant Today? I Say Yes!

The fundamental objectives of policing (also referred to as the mission of the police or the core functions of policing) are the ultimate purposes for which police agencies have been created. Goldstein was one of a number of scholars who recognized and articulated the breadth and complexity of the police mission. He synthesized the understanding of the multiple objectives of the police in his seminal work; Policing a Free Society, a precursor to his writings on problem oriented policing.

Shaping and Adapting: Using the Environment (The Last Hundred Yards) To Unlock the Power of Colonel John Boyd’s OODA Loop

In April of 2015 I posted an outstanding research paper from United States Marine Corps Major P.J. Tremblay titled “Shaping and Adapting: Unlocking the Power of Colonel John Boyd’s OODA Loop.” The paper is thoroughly researched and discusses numerous factors crucial in making sound decisions.

Informative Fair and Impartial Podcast: Do the legal rules for using deadly force, still make sense?

I found the Criminal Injustice with David A. Harris page today and listened to Episode 32 Do the legal rules for using deadly force, set by the Supreme Court in the 1980s, still make sense? Do they protect the officer and the public, or is it time to change how police make the decision to take a life? I found the discussion between David A.

Crisis Intervention Teams & Police Interactions with People with Mental Illness: Evolving Tactics That Make a Difference

It was a crisis call that may well have ended in tragedy. Police responded to an incident at a group home and a group home worker answered the door with a knife in hand. Police reached for their guns.

"Once guns are drawn, things happen fast," Cops understand this very well!

How Does The Last Hundred Yards, Enhance Tactical Responses to Crises?

The strategic and tactical mind takes into consideration all the key factors of a dynamic and competitive encounter. While we converge on the scene of a crises, we know from training we are supposed to set up tactically and make observations to get a feel for what's going on (orientation). Once we make a judgment about what we believe is going on we make decisions that help us gain the advantage before we take action. Hell we are taught the importance of tactical set ups and perimeter in the police academy.

Complacency and False Sense of Urgency: Why We Fail to Take Advantage of The Last Hundred Yards?

The problem is complacency. We have all seen it. Yet we underestimate its power and its prevalence. Highly destructive complacency is, in fact, all around us, including in places where people would deny it, deny it, and deny it still more.

The Last Hundred Yards: Operate On Blind Luck or Win Consistently?

"If you are lucky and trust in luck alone, even your successes reduce you to the defensive; if you are unlucky you are already there." ~Frederick the Great

Syndicate content