Policing a free Society

Police Ethos:The Warrior and Guardian Mindset Are They Not One In the Same?

Over the last several years there has been much discussion in policing on the terms warrior and guardian or I should say, warrior verses guardian. The political climate and or political correctness from both inside and outside policing has clouded and created much uncertainty, that puts both police and those they serve in danger. For generations, police have trained, fought crime and violence and died because of what some men did contrary to our way of life. The American way of life.

What was Boyd Thinking and...What Can Policing Learn From It?

I just had to share this piece and great illustration on John Boyd's work from Chet Richards's site Slightly East of New. All too often in policing we play follow the follower when it comes to new ideas, strategy and tactics.

STARTING AND GROWING A NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH

Heather Nye, an Outreach Intern from the National Home Security Alliance, Staysafe.org asked me if i would post this article on Starting and growing a Neighborhood Watch. My 30 years as a police officer I always loved working with the community. In today's current climate where there are a lot of misunderstandings and often times mistrust of police I feel that groups like the neighborhood watch is a great way to build mutual trust between the people and the police.

Pete’s Combat Wish List Pt 2: Mental Models, Mistakes, Reflection and Learning on the Fly

Mental models are the images, assumptions, and stories which we carry in our minds of ourselves, other people, institutions, and every aspect of the world. Like a pane of glass framing and subtly distorting our vision, mental models determine what we see. Human beings cannot navigate through the complex environments of our world without cognitive “mental maps”; and all of these mental maps, by definition, are flawed in some way.

Pete’s Wish List for Combat Warriors. Perhaps Some Lessons for Poliicng as Well?

I love this wish list by Pete Turner. It fits policing as well, as what I am teaching cops this year Procedural Justice and Combatting Violent Extremism. His take on emotional verse cultural intelligence is spot on and describes as well what we police must consider and how we police must be more deliberate in our policing efforts, to be more effective.

What Affect Does the Human Dimension and Human Bias Have on Policing?

There remains an awful lot of negative perceptions of police here in America. Since the summer of 2014, the issue of policing exploded in the national consciousness, etched there by video of one person after another dying at the hands of police.

Police Officer Discretion…and Focusing Our Efforts on Better Outcomes

“While improvements in policing have usually resulted from revelations of wrongdoing or the documentation of inadequacies, it does not follow that public dissatisfaction has always produced change. With monotonous regularity, peaks of interest in the police have been followed at both national and local levels by the appointment of a group of citizens to examine the specific problem that has surfaced and to make recommendations for dealing with it. In the heat of the moment the appointment of such a group has often, by itself, been sufficient to reduce public anxiety.

Second Episode in This Podcast Series with Complete Emergency Managment: Leadership in Public Safety

In the first episode with Complete EM George and I discussed Active Shooters and After Action Reviews. In this second of two episodes Leadership in Public Safety George Whitney and I talk about the differences between management and leadership; mistakes and gross negligence; success and failure during response.

Sir Robert Peels, Nine Key Principles of Policing: Fair and Impartial Policing Defined Back In 1829!

Defining the path to community policing is based on Sir Robert Peels, nine key principles of policing he offered up back in 1829. When reading these I cannot help but think all the time we in policing spend trying to re-invent the wheel of sound ethical, fair and impartial policing when all we really need to do is adapt what already exists to the current climate.

  • Principle 1 – “The basic mission for which the police exist is to prevent crime and disorder.”
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