Tactics

Recommended Reading List From The California Association of Tactical Officers

Sid Heal, acting in his capacity as California Association of Tactical Officers president, recently solicited input from numerous tactical science experts to compile a reading list for SWAT team commanders. After numerous edits and revisions, the following 12 have books were identified. Sid was clear to state that this is a living list. Many fine books did not make the cut as it was being edited down to a manageable number. The number 12 was selected because that would equate to one book a month.

The Art of Manliness Discusses...The Tao of Boyd: How to Master the OODA Loop

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John Boyd is described by some as the greatest military strategist in history that no one knows. He began his military career as a fighter pilot in the Korean War, but he slowly transformed himself into one of the greatest philosopher-warriors to ever live.

Have You Stopped a Car Today? Improving Patrols Tactical Effectiveness with Vehicle Stops

Conducting traffic stops is a patrol duty of police officers. Not only does it help us keep the roads and the people traveling them, safe, it also proactively help us cops identify crimes and those committing them. The combination of traffic safety, crime prevention, investigating crimes and apprehension of criminals come from an initiative driven proactive approach. Car stops are one of the tactical approaches we use for solving a host of police problems. Quite frankly car stops are a big part of our jobs as cops.

Tactical Philosophy 101 A Guest Post by Louis Hayes

When setting up my account, LinkedIn asked me to find a "headline"...one that adequately captured the essence of my professional life. Nothing seemed to fit. That was, until I recalled a moniker jokingly given during hostage rescue training. It was a perfect paradox, representing the two contrasting aspects of my job: Tactical Philosopher. In the words of a friend, it labels me "a shooter who's a thinker and a thinker who's a shooter!"

Force Science Research Study: The Influence of Officer Positioning on Movement During a Threatening Traffic Stop Scenario

"Officers spend a lot of their time in (and around) vehicles, so getting into gunfights near cars is pretty common.” ~Doug Wyllie

With that in mind, I want to call your attention to an excellent new study from Force Science Institute entitled “The Influence of Officer Positioning on Movement During a Threatening Traffic Stop Scenario.”

What Do OODA Loop’s Mean to the Street Cop, Wanting To Become “World Class” Tacticians?

Three officers respond at 3AM to the call of a disturbance. When they arrive, there are three people present, two males and a female. One male is intoxicated; I will only focus on him for the purpose of this example. Intoxicated male is spoken to by responding officers. They tell him to call it a night and to go to bed and sleep it off. He says he will and turns to go into the house. The officers continue gathering information for the incident report.

What Makes a "World Class" Tactically Proficient Peacekeeper?

I had a discussion on facebook that centered on the question; how can a law enforcement organization gain “world class” tactical proficiency? This posed an insightful question from my good friend Marshall Wallace, What is "world class"? Is there a definition or metric that would allow an officer to know that he/she was approaching that level? I thought to myself that, my friend is the question? What is “world class” and how do we measure it?

Tactical Decision Games to Increase Speed and Maturity of Problem Solving: The Lessons Learned

“Confronted with a task, and having less information available than is needed to perform that task, an organization may react in either of two ways. One is to increase its information-processing capacity, the other to design the organization, and indeed the task itself, in such a way as to enable it to operate on the basis of less information. These approaches are exhaustive; no others are conceivable. A failure to adopt one or the other will automatically result in a drop in the level of performance.” —Martin van Creveld, Command in War

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