Winning at low cost

Cops With War Toys: Militarizing police is the worst way to fight crime.

Alexandria, Virginia’s annual big event is its George Washington’s Birthday parade. When I lived there, I usually went. One year, as President Washington passed in his carriage, I gave him a proper 18th-century bow-and-scrape—real conservatives know how to do these things. He was so pleased he stood up in his landau, doffed his hat and bowed to me in return.

The Cops Amaze Me by Bob Lonsberry

(Photo Courtesy: www.cnn.com)

 

The cops amaze me.

Some days I honestly don’t know how they do it.

Like yesterday, at the Navy Yard.

We know about the bad guy, we know about his military record and his criminal record. And we know what he did.

But we don’t know much about how he came to stop doing what he was doing.

We don’t know much about how they took him down.

Fighting the good fight with moral clarity by Lt. Dan Marcou

A great piece by LT Dan Marcou over at Police One on what it means to win on the moral dimension of conflict and hence win at low cost. Stay oriented! Fred

You can sell your honor for a penny or a punch, but once it’s gone, you can’t buy it back for a million bucks

SWAT Cop Says American Neighborhoods Are 'Battlefields,' Claims Cops Face Same Dangers As Soldiers In Afghanistan

I just got the kindle edition of Rise of the Warrior Cop The Militarization of America's Police Forces By Radley Balko. Balko has been writing a lot of the last several years on the topic of police militarization and recently has been taking a lot of heat from law enforcement and I have posted many of the articles on the topic here on the web-site.

Overmilitarization: Why Law Enforcement Needs to Scale Down Its Use of Military Hardware and Tactics By Evan Bernick

Call it American law enforcement’s “We’re going to need a bigger boat” moment.

Police militarization and the Ethical Warrior By Jack E. Hoban & Bruce J. Gourlie

The public has nothing to fear from well-trained tactical teams made up of motivated Ethical Warriors

Police militarization has become a popular topic in the mainstream media — people are even writing books about it. Allegations abound that American law enforcement is becoming an aggressive, over-gunned commando army. Critics argue that our police are becoming militarized, adopting the weapons and attitudes of the battlefield for policing America’s streets.

Is this concern valid?

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