Winning at low cost

Police militarization and rise of the warrior journalist by Lance Eldridge

Radley Balko’s new book on police militarization — and subsequent articles by him and others — signals the radicalization of America’s discourse on civilian law enforcement

The spate of recent anti-police articles appearing in mainstream media, including the BBC, are a result of Radley Balko’s new book, Rise of the Warrior Cop: The Militarization of America’s Police Forces.

Safe Streets, Overruled By Heather McDonald of the City Journal

A judge’s appalling decision will endanger New York’s most vulnerable residents.

The Psychotic Militarization of Law Enforcement

by Sartre Batr

 

The Human Problem? by Frank Borelli an Officer.com article

It’s always been better, in my opinion, to work for a Chief who isn’t eager to hang his troops out to dry. Not that he’d “cover” for them, but he’d understand mistakes can happen.

Guest Post: Bad Boys What You Gonna Do When You’re Wearing Blue: Police Behaving Badly

Noah Kovacs has over ten years experience in the legal field. He has since retired early and enjoys blogging about small business law, legal marketing, and everything in between. He recently purchased his first cabin and spends his free time remodeling its kitchen for his family. Twitter: @NoahKovacs

What Makes a "World Class" Tactically Proficient Peacekeeper?

I had a discussion on facebook that centered on the question; how can a law enforcement organization gain “world class” tactical proficiency? This posed an insightful question from my good friend Marshall Wallace, What is "world class"? Is there a definition or metric that would allow an officer to know that he/she was approaching that level? I thought to myself that, my friend is the question? What is “world class” and how do we measure it?

Boyd and Beyond Boston 2013: Balancing Pursuasion and Force in The Moral, Mental and Physical Dimensions of Conflict

"Avoid war by every possible means in all possible circumstances, but always act as is it might start at any time. Gather intelligence on the enemy and his mentality, and monitor his movements continuously. Campaign vigorously, both offensively and defensively, but attack mostly with small units; emphasize patrolling, raiding, and skirmishing rather than all out attacks. Replace battles of attrition with the "nonbattle" of maneuver. Strive to end wars successfully by recruiting allies to change the overall balance of power. Subversion is the best path to victory.

Latest P1 Column: The anatomy of victory (part two): Victory at minimal cost

In part one of this two-part series, we asked and answered a lot of important questions about our preparedness to win. If you haven’t yet read part one, please do so before reading one, for it is the foundation on which that what follows is built.

The anatomy of victory (part one): What does it take to win?

Winning on the street comes in many forms and means different things to different people.

Winning in law enforcement encounters can be gaining voluntary compliance through communication and negotiation or it can ebb and flow back and forth through a vast array of outcomes up to and including deadly force. Winning to the cop means one thing, while to an adversary winning on his terms is quite another.

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