Decision Making

Keys to Training Excellence: Evidence Based Research Policing Can Use

Been talking about and doing experiential learning and the art of facilitation in police training for well over a decade (closer to 2 decades). "When it comes to police training the method of delivery (not the content) determined the maintenance and flexibility of the skill.” Its about how we teach the programs that matters! Rote learning via PowerPoint lectures and check the box training programs teaching solely skill sets and school solutions must end.

PODCAST: Tactical Decision Games with Bruce Gudmundsson and Don Vandergriff

Military leaders are faced with a dilemma unique among the professions. While doctors get to practice medicine, architects get to design buildings, and educators get to teach students on a daily basis, military professionals spend the vast majority of their careers preparing to do a job they rarely, and in some fortunate cases, never have to actually perform.

How to Make a Small Unit Decision Forcing Cases by Bruce Gudmundsson

This article provides a step-by-step guide to the creation of a decision-forcing case about a dilemma faced by a small unit leader at some time in the past century or so.

Of Garbage Cans and Paradox: Reflexively Reviewing Design, Mission Command, and the Gray Zone:

Just read this piece this morning by Grant Martin, Of Garbage Cans and Paradox: Reflexively Reviewing Design, Mission Command, and the Gray Zone. What a great analysis on how bureaucracies, work and how to overcome or better yet, how to use them in technical or linear problems and learn how to adapt problem solving methods in the gray zon

Wrestling With Delayed and Immediate Entry, Solo and Team Tactics...Are We Really Expecting All to Go as Rehersed?

I was out in the western part of Massachusetts teaching an in-service training class to a group of about 50 police officers. These cops are from small towns and often work their towns alone. No back-up immediately available! A conversation during class took place that sparked some debate on immediate versus delayed, solo versus team entry tactics and which is the best practice for dealing with ongoing threats such as, an active shooter, terrorist attack, or ambushes. Is immediate entry and a solo response always the way to go, or do 2, 3 and 4-man techniques still apply?

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