Decision Making

“More Better,” Ideals, and To Be or To Do: Guest Post by Scott Shipman

Several years ago I frequented a barber shop owned by a Vietnamese immigrant named, Tom. Tom had been in the United States for over a decade, but hadn’t mastered very much English. However, that didn’t seem to be holding him back as he had/has a thriving business, and does a good job at a good price. The signature conclusion of Tom’s haircuts was rotate the barber chair so the customer could look in the mirror and either approve or disapprove of his work.

Learning Like an Expert: A Guest Post by Marshall Wallace

This guest post is from a fellow Boydian thinker, and friend Marshall Wallace. Marshall had mentioned at one of our Boyd and Beyond Boston meetings that he was working on a paper "Learning Like an Expert" below are his insights into what we need to do to create and nurture critical thinkers and problem solvers, this includes those of us in law enforcement.

Marshall explains There are four tools that the Training of Trainers needs to model. This modeling represents, on the one hand, how to gain experience, while on the other it also shows how to continue self-training.

What Represents a High Level of Professionalism?


“The essential thing is action. Action has three stages: the decision born of thought, the order or preparation for execution, and the execution itself. All three stages are governed by the will. The will is rooted in character, and for the man of action character is of more critical importance than intellect. Intellect without will is worthless, will without intellect is dangerous.” ~Hans von Seeckt

Guest Post by Michael G. Moore: Boyd's Snowmobile ...or what made Alexander “The Great”

The whole point of observation in the context of policing is so that we are able to make sense of what’s going on in real time rapidly changing conditions. We make situational assessments in the midst of uncertainty as circumstances ebb and flow through our minds that we interpret based on our life experience and the unfolding conditions we now find ourselves in. The patterns we recognize make sense to us and hence we are capable to responding accordingly. However what if the patterns we are observing does not make sense?

Learning to Adapt With A Professional Reading Program


The Professional Reading Program is intended to save leaders that most precious commodity - time.

This post was inspired by a post at the Business Insider: General James 'Mad Dog' Mattis Email About Being 'Too Busy To Read' Is A Must-Read The General was asked by a colleague about the importance of reading for officers who often exclaimed they were too busy to read. The general’s response:

Guest Post by Tyana Daley: Developing Law Enforcement Leaders and Nurturing Smart Thinkers

In the years to come, police agencies will likely encounter a heightened need for solid leadership as a combination of factors challenges law enforcement. Senior-level law enforcement officials will retire, creating a vacuum in the upper ranks and a shortage of experienced leadership talent.

What Do OODA Loop’s Mean to the Street Cop, Wanting To Become “World Class” Tacticians?

Three officers respond at 3AM to the call of a disturbance. When they arrive, there are three people present, two males and a female. One male is intoxicated; I will only focus on him for the purpose of this example. Intoxicated male is spoken to by responding officers. They tell him to call it a night and to go to bed and sleep it off. He says he will and turns to go into the house. The officers continue gathering information for the incident report.

Satan Never Sleeps: A Guest Post by John Farnam

John S. Farnam, president of Defensive Training International, is one of the top handgun instructors in the world. He has personally trained thousands of federal, state and local law enforcement personnel, as well as non-police, in the serious use of firearms.

Tactical Decision Games to Increase Speed and Maturity of Problem Solving: The Lessons Learned

“Confronted with a task, and having less information available than is needed to perform that task, an organization may react in either of two ways. One is to increase its information-processing capacity, the other to design the organization, and indeed the task itself, in such a way as to enable it to operate on the basis of less information. These approaches are exhaustive; no others are conceivable. A failure to adopt one or the other will automatically result in a drop in the level of performance.” —Martin van Creveld, Command in War

The Path to Better Execution in Seeing, Understanding and Solving Complex Problems is a Learning Organization

“…organizations where people continually expand their capacity to create the results they truly desire, where new and expansive patterns of thinking are nurtured, where collective aspiration is set free, and where people are continually learning to see the whole together.” ~Peter Senge

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